Home » Blog » Predictions

Predictions

asimovIn 1964 Isaac Asimov, the great science fiction writer,
published an article in the New York Times. In it he made
predictions for 2014, some of which were incredibly accurate:

  • By 2014, electroluminescent panels will be in
    common use. 
  • Gadgetry will continue to relieve mankind of
    tedious jobs.
  • Complete lunches and dinners, with the food
    semiprepared, will be stored in the freezer until ready for processing.
  • Robots will neither be common nor very good in
    2014, but they will be in existence.
  • …computers, much miniaturized…
  • experimental fusion-power plant or two will
    already exist in 2014.
  • Large solar-power stations will also be in
    operation
  • Much effort will be put into the designing of
    vehicles with “Robot-brains”*vehicles that can be set for particular
    destinations and that will then proceed there without interference by
    the slow reflexes of a human driver.
  • Communications will become sight-sound and you
    will see as well as hear the person you telephone.
  • The screen can be used not only to see the
    people you call but also for studying documents and photographs and
    reading passages from books.
  • Synchronous satellites, hovering in space will
    make it possible for you to direct-dial any spot on earth, including
    the weather stations in Antarctica
  • In 2014, there is every likelihood that the
    world population will be 6,500,000,000 and the population of the United
    States will be 350,000,000

Of course, there were mistakes, too. But, look at what he correctly
predicted! Take ten minutes and ask yourself, what is likely to take
place in the year ahead in your life? What are your personal
predictions for 2014?


I’m predicting
that we’ll finally have a computer will search my e-mail automatically
and delete every message that begins with ‘thought you’d be
interested,’ and then give an electrical shock to the sender to remind
him or her to stop sending that kind of message.

– Scott Adams